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Introduction, General Information
Lubrication and Maintenance
Front Suspension and Steering Linkage
Rear Axle
Brakes
Cooling System
Dodge Diplomat cars www.dippy.org
Front Suspension and Steering Linkage

 

CONTENTS

BEARINGS (FRONT WHEEL)
DIAGNOSIS
GENERAL INFORMATION
LOWER BALL JOINT
LOWER CONTROL ARM
PRE-ALIGNMENT INSPECTION
SERVICE PROCEDURES
SPECIAL TOOLS
SPECIFICATIONS
STEERING KNUCKLE
STEERING KNUCKLE ARM
STEERING LINKAGE
SWAY BAR
TIGHTENING REFERENCE
TORSION BARS
UPPER BALL JOINT
UPPER CONTROL ARM
WHEEL ALIGNMENT
WHEEL ALIGNMENT ADJUSTMENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION  (back to CONTENTS)

FIG. 1 - Front Suspension

The front suspension on rear wheel drive vehicles has transverse torsion bars reacting on the outboard ends of the lower control arms. Each torsion bar is anchored in the front crossmember opposite the affected wheel. From the anchor the torsion bar extends parallel to the front crossmember through a “pivot cushion bushing” (attached to the crossmember) then turns and extends rearward to the lower control arm. The bar end is provided with an isolated bushing which is bolted to the lower control arm and sway bar and acts as the lower control arm “strut.”

Height is controlled by the torsion bar anchor adjusting bolts located in the front crossmember. The right torsion bar is adjusted from the left side and the left torsion bar is adjusted from the right side.

The torsion bar includes the “Pivot Cushion Bushing” and “Bushing To Lower Control Arm” as an assembly.

The lower control arm inner ends are bolted to the crossmember and pivot through a bushing.

Front suspension heights must be held to specifications for proper wheel alignment and tire wear, satisfactory ride, correct bumper heights and appearance.

See Group “0” in this manual for all lubrication specifications referenced in Front Suspension Group.

Refer to “Frame,” Group 13 for disassembly and assembly steps for crossmember and isolator replacement as it affects front suspension
and alignment procedures specified in this group.

Caution: Where it is convenient to remove the manifold heat shields during suspension repair and or alignment operations, it is essential that the manifold heat shields be correctly repositioned and attached with all holding clips in place as originally installed.

FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE DIAGNOSIS  (back to CONTENTS)

FRONT END NOISE

EXCESSIVE STEERING FREE-PLAY

STEERING WHEEL OSCILLATION

ROAD WANDER

LATERAL PULL

EXCESSIVE STEERING EFFORT

SERVICE PROCEDURES  (back to CONTENTS)

WHEEL ALIGNMENT  (back to CONTENTS)

Front wheel alignment is the proper adjustment of all the interrelated suspension angles affecting the running and steering of the front wheels of the vehicle. The importance of wheel alignment and wheel balancing is considered essential in order to maintain ease of steering, good directional stability and to prevent abnormal tire wear.

Inspection of the front suspension and steering components is a preventive maintenance service and also has a definite bearing on the safe operation of the vehicle.

The method of checking front alignment will vary depending on the type of equipment being used. The instructions furnished by the manufacturer of the equipment should always be followed, with the exception that the specifications recommended by Chrysler Corporation be used.

There are six basic factors which are the foundation of front wheel alignment, height, caster, camber, toe-in, steering axis inclination and toe-out on turns (Fig. 2). All are mechanically adjustable except steering axis inclination and toe-out on turns. The latter two are valuable in determining if parts are bent or damaged particularly when the camber and caster adjustments cannot be brought within the recommended specifications.

FIG. 2 - Alignment Factors

Do not attempt to modify any suspension or steering components by heating or bending.

All adjustments and checks should be made in the following sequence:
(a) Front suspension height
(b) Caster and Camber
(c) Toe-in
(d) Steering Axis Inclination (Not Adjustable)
(e) Toe-out on turns (Not Adjustable)

Caster is the number of degrees of forward or backward tilt of the spindle support arm at the top. Forward tilt of the spindle support arm at the top is negative caster. Backward tilt of the spindle support arm at the top from true vertical is positive caster.

Camber is the number of degrees the top of the wheel is tilted inward or outward from a true vertical. Inward tilt of the top of the wheel from true vertical is negative camber. Outward tilt of the wheel at the top is positive camber. Excessive camber is a tire wear factor: negative camber causes wear on the inside of the tire, while positive camber causes wear to the outside.

Toe in is measured in inches or degrees and is the distance the leading edges of the tires are closer than the trailing edges. Toe-in is considered the most serious cause for excessive tire wear. Toe-in is the last of the alignment angles to be set in the front wheel alignment operation.

Steering Axis Inclination is measured in degrees and is the amount the spindle support center line is tilted from true vertical. It has a fixed relationship with camber settings and does not change except when components are damaged or bent. This angle is not adjustable and damaged parts must be replaced.

Toe-out on Turns (Turning Radius) is measured in degrees and is the amount one front wheel turns sharper than the other on a turn. This angle is designed into the steering arms in relationship to the wheelbase of the vehicle and is not adjustable. When checking the turning radius and it is found not to be within the recommended specifications, look for possible bent or damaged components.

PRE-ALIGNMENT INSPECTION  (back to CONTENTS)

Before any attempt is made to change or correct the wheel alignment factors, the following inspection and necessary corrections must be made on those parts which influence the steering of the vehicle.

(1) Check and inflate tire to recommended pressure. All tires should be same size and be in good condition and have approximately same wear. Note type of tire tread wear (described in “Wheels, Bearings, Tires”, Group 22) which will aid in diagnosis.
(2) Check and adjust front wheel bearings
(3) Check front wheel and tire assembly for radial and lateral runout (follow the Equipment Manufacturers Instructions (Group 22).
(4) Inspect ball joints and. all steering linkage pivot points for excessive looseness.
(5) Check rear springs for cracks or broken leaves and “U” bolts for proper tightness. (Vehicle should be on level floor or on alignment rack) with a full tank of fuel and no luggage or passenger load.
(6) Front suspension heights must only be checked after vehicle has the recommended tire pressures, full tank of fuel, no passenger or luggage compartment load and is on a level floor or alignment rack.
To obtain accurate readings, vehicle should be jounced in following manner just prior to taking each measurement (Height - Caster - Camber and Toe) Grasp bumpers at center (rear bumper first) and jounce up and down several times. Always release bumpers at bottom of down cycle after jouncing both rear and front ends an equal number of times.

WHEEL ALIGNMENT ADJUSTMENTS  (back to CONTENTS)

Front wheel alignment settings must be held to specifications to hold tire wear to a minimum and to maintain steering ease and handling of vehicle.

The equipment manufacturers recommended procedure should always be followed. Any parts of the front suspension system should be replaced if they are found to be bent. Do not attempt to straighten any bent part.

Height
Front suspension heights must be measured with the recommended tire pressures (See Group 22) with no passenger or luggage compartment load. Vehicle should have a full tank of gasoline or equivalent weight compensation. Car must be on a level surface.

Typically a new car will settle some during the first 2,000 miles of operation. To compensate for this initial front height loss, the assembly plants set front suspension heights somewhat higher than the service specification. Therefore on new cars, front heights should not be reset if they are no more than 1/2 inch higher than the height specified.

(1) Clean all foreign material from the areas where height measurements are taken (Fig. 3).
(2) The front of the car must be jounced vigorously to eliminate friction effects before making car height measurements. It is recommended that the front bumper amplitude (total vertical movement) during jouncing be at least 4 inches, which may require two people. The vehicles should be jounced several times releasing it at the bottom of the downward motion.
(3) Front car height is measured from the head of the front suspension front crossmember isolator bolt to ground (Fig. 3).
(4) Compare measurement with specifications and “New Car” recommendations described above. To adjust, if necessary, turn torsion bar adjusting bolt clockwise to increase height and counterclockwise to reduce height.
(5) After each adjustment, jounce vehicle as in (2) above before remeasuring. Both sides must be measured even though only one side has been adjusted.
(6) Front heights should not vary more than 1/4 inch (6.4 mm) from the specifications when resetting and also should be within 1/4 inch (6.4 mm) side to side.

FIG. 3 - Height Measurement Points

Camber and Caster
(1) Prepare vehicle for measuring wheel alignment.
(2) Determine initial camber and caster readings to confirm variance to specifications before loosening pivot bar bolts.
(3) Remove foreign material from exposed threads of pivot bar bolts.
(4) Loosen nuts slightly holding pivot (caster camber) bar (Fig. 4). Slightly loosening the pivot bar nuts will allow the upper control arm to be repositioned without slipping to end of adjustment slots.
(5) Position claw of Tool C-4576 on pivot bar and pin of tool into holes provided in tower or bracket (Fig. 5). Make adjustments by moving pivot bar in or out. Adjust as follows.
Camber: Move both ends of upper control arm in or out exactly equal amounts.
Caster: Moving one end of the bar will change caster (and camber). To preserve camber while adjusting caster, move each end of the upper control arm pivot bar exactly equal amounts in opposite directions. For example, to increase positive caster move front of pivot bar away from engine, then move rear of pivot bar towards engine an equal amount. Caster should be held as nearly equal as possible on both wheels.
(6) Tighten pivot bar holding bolts to specified torque; 150 ft. lbs. (203 N•m).

FIG. 4 - Loosening Pivot Bolt Nuts FIG. 5 - Adjusting Camber/Caster with Tool C-4576

Setting Toe
The toe setting should be the final operation of the front wheel alignment adjustments. In all cases, follow equipment manufacturers procedure.

(1) Secure steering wheel in “straight-ahead” position. On vehicles equipped with power steering, start engine before centering steering wheel. (Engine should be kept running while adjusting toe).
(2) Loosen tie rod clamp bolts.
(3) Adjust toe by turning tie rod sleeves. To avoid a binding condition in either tie rod assembly, rotate both tie rod ends in direction of sleeve travel during adjustment. (See Fig. 6). This will ensure that both ends will be in the center of their travel when tightening sleeve clamps. Shut off engine.
(4) Position sleeve clamps so ends do not locate in the sleeve slot, then tighten clamp bolts as specified. Be sure clamp bolts are indexed at or near bottom to avoid possible interference with torsion bars when vehicle is in full jounce.
Upon completion of alignment operations, it is essential that the splash shields, if removed, be correctly reinstalled with all holding clips in place.

FIG. 6 - Tie Rod Adjustment

TORSION BARS  (back to CONTENTS)

Torsion bars are formed with an angle for transverse mounting.

Each bar is hex shaped on the anchor end with a replaceable torsion bar to lower control arm bushing on the opposite end and a pivot cushion bushing (permanently attached) midway on the bar creating right and left hand assemblies.

The hex end of the bar is anchored in the crossmember (opposite the affected wheel) extends parallel to the front crossmember, through the pivot cushion bushing (also attached to the crossmember) turns, and attaches to the lower control arm through the torsion bar to lower control arm bushing.

Removal—Torsion Bar and Anchor (Fig. 7)
(1) Raise car on hoist and support vehicle so that front suspension is in full rebound position.
(2) Release load on both torsion bars by turning anchor adjusting bolts in frame crossmember counterclockwise. Remove anchor adjusting bolt on torsion bar to be removed (Fig. 8).
(3) Raise lower control arms until clearance between crossmember ledge (at jounce bumper) and torsion bar end bushing is 2-7/8 inches (63.0 mm) (Fig. 9). Support lower control arms at this design height (equal to three passenger position with vehicle on ground). This is necessary to align sway bar and lower control arm attaching points for disassembly and component re-alignment and attachment during reassembly.
(4) Remove sway bar to control arm attaching bolt and retainers (Fig. 10).
(5) Remove two bolts attaching torsion bar end bushing to lower control arm (Fig. 7).
(6) Remove two bolts attaching torsion bar pivot cushion bushing to crossmember, and remove torsion bar and anchor assembly from crossmember (Fig. 11).
(7) Carefully separate anchor from torsion bar (Fig. 12).

FIG. 7 - Torsion Bars FIG. 8 - Torsion Bar Anchor Bolt FIG. 9 - Measuring "Design Height" FIG. 10 - Sway bar to Torsion Bar End Bushing FIG. 11 - Pivot Cushion Bushing FIG. 12 - Anchor and Swivel Installation

Torsion Bar to Lower Control Arm Bushing
See “inspection” to determine if only the torsion bar to lower control arm requires replacement. Service replacement bars include pivot cushion bushing and torsion bar to lower control arm bushing.

Replace bushing as follows.
(1) Clamp assembly in vise with rivet head up (hex end of bar down) (Fig. 13).
CAUTION: Never clamp the bar in a vise unless soft vise jaw inserts (brass, aluminum, etc.) are used.
(2) Center punch the rivet head and drill a 3/8-inch (9.5 mm) diameter hole approximately
1/2-inch (12.5 mm) deep, a short length of 5/16inch (8mm) rod can be used to remove the rivet (Fig. 13). It may be necessary to remove flange of rivet head before driving rivet out.
CAUTION: Do not enlarge the 7/16-inch (11 mm) diameter hole in the bar.
(3) Remove bushing from bar.
(4) Install new bushing. Rough area under bushing may be cleaned with sandpaper if necessary for easy assembly. New bushing should go on by hand.
(5) Install bushing retaining bolt and tighten nut to 50 ft. lbs. (68 N•m).

FIG. 13 - Bushing Removal (Torsion Bar to Control Arm)

Inspection
(1) Inspect seal for damage, replace if damaged.
(2) Inspect bushing to lower control arm and pivot cushion bushing.
Inspect seals on cushion bushing for cuts, tears or severe deterioration that may allow moisture under cushion (Fig. 14). If corrosion is evident, the torsion bar assembly should be replaced.
(3) Remove all foreign matter from hex opening(s) in anchors and from hex end(s) of torsion bar.
(4) Inspect torsion bar adjusting bolt and swivel and replace if there is any sign of corrosion or other damage (Fig. 12). Lubricate for easy installation.

FIG. 14 - Pivot Cushion Bushing Seals

Installation (Torsion Bar and Anchor)
(1) Carefully slide balloon seal over end of torsion bar (cupped end toward hex).
(2) Coat hex end of torsion bar with MOPAR Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part Number 4318062 or equivalent.
(3) Install torsion bar hex end into anchor bracket. With torsion bar in a horizontal position, the ears of the anchor bracket should be positioned nearly straight up, as shown in Figure 12. Position swivel into anchor bracket ears.
(4) Place bushing end of bar into position on top of lower control arm. Then, install anchor bracket assembly into crossmember anchor retainer and install anchor adjusting bearing and bolt.
(5) Attach pivot cushion bushing to crossmember with two bolt and washer assemblies. Leave bolt and washer assemblies loose enough to install friction plates, see Figure 7 and step 7.
(6) With lower control arms at “design height” (see “Removal” Step 3) install two bolt and nut assemblies attaching torsion bar bushing to lower control arm. Torque to 70 ft. lbs. (95 N•m).
(7) Ensure that torsion bar anchor bracket is fully seated in crossmember, see Figure 15. Then install friction plates Fig. 11) between crossmember and pivot cushion bushing with open end of slot to rear and bottomed out on mounting bolt. Tighten cushion bushing bolts to 85 ft. lbs. (115 N•m).
(8) Position balloon seal over anchor bracket.
(9) Reinstall bolt, through sway bar, retainer cushions and sleeve and attach to lower control arm end bushing (Fig. 16). Torque bolt to 65 ft. lbs. (88 N•m).
(10) Load torsion bar by turning anchor adjusting bolt clockwise.
(11) Lower vehicle and adjust torsion bar height to specifications.

FIG. 15 - Torsion Bar Anchor Assembly Installation FIG. 16 - Installing Sway Bar End Bolt

BEARINGS (FRONT WHEEL)  (back to CONTENTS)

Lubrication
Under normal service, the lubricant in front wheel bearings should be inspected whenever the hub and rotor assemblies are removed to inspect or service the brake system, or at least every 30,000 miles (48000 kilometers). The bearings should be cleaned and repacked with a High Temperature Multipurpose E.P. Grease, whenever disc brake rotors are resurfaced.

For severe service vehicles, (such as vehicles involving frequent or continuous brake application) wheel bearings should be inspected whenever the rotors are removed to inspect or service the brake system. Clean and repack the bearings with a high temperature wheel bearing grease whenever brake shoes are replaced, or at least every 9,000 miles (14000 kilometers), whichever occurs first.

Check lubricant to see that it is adequate in quantity and quality. If grease is low in quantity, contains dirt, appears dry or has been contaminated with water to produce a milky appearance, bearings should be cleaned and completely repacked. NEVER ADD GREASE TO WHEEL BEARINGS.

When relubrication is required, discard old seal. Thoroughly clean old lubricant from bearings and from hub cavity (Fig. 17). Inspect rollers for signs of pitting or other surface distress. Light bearing discoloration should be considered norRH207 mal. Bearings must be replaced if any defects exist. For all service, repack the bearings with a high temperature wheel bearing grease, MOPAR Front Wheel Bearing Grease (High Temperature) Part Number 4318064, or equivalent, is a grease of this type and is recommended. Use of a bearing packer is recommended. A small amount of new grease should also be added to hub cavity.

FIG. 17 - Hub Cavity

Removal
(1) Raise vehicle so front wheels are free of floor.
(2) Remove wheel cover. Loosen and remove wheel nuts and remove wheel and tire assembly.
(3) Remove grease cap, cotter pin, nut lock, and bearing adjusting nut.
(4) Remove the disc brake sliding caliper retaining clips and anti-rattle springs.
(5) Slowly slide caliper housing assembly up and away from brake disc and support caliper housing on steering knuckle arm. Do not let caliper housing hang by brake hose, as possible brake hose damage may result.
(6) Remove thrust washer and outer bearing cone.
(7) Slide hub and rotor assembly off the spindle.
(8) Carefully drive out inner seal and remove bearing cone with 3/4 inch diameter nonmetallic rod.

Cleaning and Inspection
(1) Clean the hub and bearings using kerosene, mineral spirits, or other similar cleaning fluids.  Do not dry the bearings by air spinning.
(2) Examine bearing cups for pitting, scoring or other imperfections. If cups are damaged, remove them from the hub with a soft steel drift.
(3) Bearing cup areas in the hub should be smooth without scored or raised metal which could keep the cups from seating against shoulders in hub.
(4) The bearing cones and rollers should have smooth, unbroken surfaces without brinnel marks.

The ends of the rollers and both cone flanges should also be smooth and free from chipping or other damage.

Installation
(1) In the event the bearing cup is found defective during inspection, install new cup. A device to aid in installing new bearing cup can be made by grinding the O.D. of a used cup slightly undersize for clearance. The used cup is utilized to press in the new cup thereby avoiding possibility of damage to new part. Care must be taken to fully seat new cup against shoulder of hub.
(2) Force lubricant between all bearing cone rollers or repack using a suitable bearing packer. A small amount of grease should be added to hub cavity.
(3) Install inner cone and a new seal with lip of seal facing inward. Using Tool C-4210, position seal flush with end of hub. The seal flange may be damaged if tool is not used.
(4) Clean spindle and apply a light coating of wheel bearing lubricant over polished surfaces.
(5) Install hub and rotor assembly on spindle and install outer bearing cone, thrust washer
and adjusting nut. Refer to bearing adjustment procedure.
(6) Slowly slide caliper housing assembly down on brake disc assembly into position on adapter. Install caliper retaining clips and anti-rattle springs. Tighten to 180 in. lbs. (20 N•m).
(7) Install tire and wheel and tighten wheel nuts to specified torque.

Adjustment
Tighten adjusting nut to 240 to 300 in. lbs. (27 to 34 N•m) while rotating wheel. Stop rotation and back off adjusting nut 1/4 turn (90°). Finger tighten adjusting nut while again rotating wheel. Position nut lock with one pair of slots in line with cotter pin hole (Fig. 18). Install cotter pin, grease cap, install wheel cover, and lower vehicle to floor.

FIG. 18 - Front Wheel Bearing Adjustment

STEERING KNUCKLE (All Car Lines)  (back to CONTENTS)

Removal
(1) Place ignition switch in OFF or UNLOCKED position.
(2) Raise front of vehicle with hand jack and place short jack stand under lower control arm. Position jack stand as close to wheel as possible. Be sure jack stand is not in contact with brake splash shield. Rubber rebound bumper must not contact frame.
CAUTION: Torsion bar will remain in loaded position.
(3) Remove wheel cover, wheel and tire assembly.
(4) Remove disc brake adaptor mounting bolts and support adaptor and caliper assembly out of way with wire. Do not hang caliper assembly by brake hose.
(5) Remove hub and disc assembly.
(6) Remove brake splash shield.
(7) Loosen bolts attaching steering arm to knuckle.
(8) Remove upper ball joint stud from steering knuckle as follows:
(a) Remove cotter pin and nut from upper and lower ball joint studs.
(b) Position ball joint remover Tool C-3564A over lower ball joint stud allowing tool to rest on knuckle arm. Set tool nut securely against upper stud (Fig. 19).
(c) Tighten tool to apply pressure to upper stud and strike knuckle sharply with hammer to loosen stud. Do not attempt to force stud out only with tool.
(9) Remove bolts attaching steering arm to knuckle and separate upper control arm from knuckle. Remove knuckle from vehicle (Fig. 20).

FIG 19. - Removing Upper Ball Joint Stud (Typical) FIG. 20 - Knuckle and Control Arm

Installation
(1) Align steering knuckle and steering arm mounting holes, insert mounting bolts and finger tighten at this time.
(2) Install upper ball joint stud in steering knuckle and install upper and lower ball joint stud nuts. Tighten upper and lower nuts to 100 ft. lbs. (136 N•m). Install cotter pins.
(3) Tighten steering knuckle bolts to 160 ft. lbs. (216 N•m).
(4) Install splash shield. Tighten screws to 220 in. lbs. (25 N•m).
(5) Replace hub and rotor assembly. Adjust wheel bearings.
(6) Install brake caliper and torque adaptor as assembly. Tighten torque adaptor mounting screws to 110 ft. lbs. (150 N•m).
(7) Install wheel and tire assembly. Tighten wheel stud nuts as specified in Group 22. Install wheel cover.

STEERING KNUCKLE ARM (All Car Lines)  (back to CONTENTS)

Removal
(1) Place ignition switch in OFF or UNLOCKED position.
(2) Remove rebound bumper.
(3) Raise vehicle on hoist to place front suspension in rebound. Use jack stands under front frame for additional support.
(4) Remove wheel cover, wheel and tire assembly.
(5) Remove brake caliper and hang out of way with wire hook during this operation to prevent damage to brake hose.
(6) Remove hub and brake disc assembly.
(7) Remove brake splash shield from steering knuckle.
(8) Unload torsion bars, by turning anchor adjusting bolt counterclockwise.
(9) Disconnect tie rod from steering knuckle arm by removing cotter pin and nut. Use Tool C-3894-A. (Fig. 20). Use care not to damage seals.
(10) Remove lower ball joint stud from knuckle arm using Tool C-3564-A.
(11) Separate knuckle arm from steering knuckle by removing two (2) nuts and two (2) attaching bolts.
(12) Remove steering knuckle arm (Fig. 20).

Installation
(1) Attach steering knuckle arm to knuckle and install two bolts and nuts and torque to 160 ft. lbs. (217 N•m).
(2) Attach lower ball joint stud to knuckle arm. Torque nut to 100 ft. lbs. (136 N•m) and install cotter key.
(3) Attach tie rod end to steering knuckle arm and inside nut. Tighten to 40 ft. lbs. (54 N•m) and install cotter pin.
(4) Load torsion bar by turning adjusting bolt on lower control arm clockwise.
(5) Install brake splash shield onto steering knuckle.
(6) Install hub and disc assembly. Adjust wheel bearing.
(7) Install wheel and tire assembly and attach wheel cover.
(8) Lower vehicle to floor, adjust front suspension heights and wheel alignment as necessary.

STEERING LINKAGE (All Car Lines)  (back to CONTENTS)

The tie rod end seals should be inspected at all oil change periods. Removal of tie rod ends from the steering knuckle arm or center link by methods other than using the recommended tools may damage tie rod end seal. (Fig. 21).

FIG. 21 - Steering Linkage (Typical All)

Damaged seals require removal of the seals and inspection of the tie rod assembly end at the throat opening. If the parts have not lost all the lubricant and are not contaminated, worn or rusted, use new seals and reinstall, otherwise, a new complete tie rod end assembly should be installed. Lubricate the tie rod end assembly with MOPAR Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part Number 4318062 or equivalent intended for this purpose.

Removal
(1) Remove tie rod ends from steering knuckle arms using Tool C-3894-A (Fig. 22).
Use care not to damage seals.
(2) Using Tool C-3894-A (Fig. 22) remove inner tie rod ends from center link.
(3) Remove idler arm stud from center link using Tool C-3894-A. Remove idler arm bolt from crossmember.
(4) Remove steering gear arm stud from center link, using Tool C-3894-A.
(5) To remove steering gear arm from gear, use Tool C-4150 (Fig. 23).

FIG. 22 - Removing Tie Rod End FIG. 23 - Removing Steering Gear Arm

Installation
Replace all tie rod and steering arm assemblies that are damaged or worn.
(1) Position idler arm assembly in bracket and install bolt. Tighten nut to 70 ft. lbs. (95 N•m) and install cotter pin. Install steering gear arm (if removed) and torque nut to 175 ft. lbs. (238 N•m).
(2) Place center link into idler arm and steering gear arm studs and tighten nuts 40 ft. lbs. (54 N•m). Install cotter pins.
(3) Connect tie rod ends to steering knuckle arms and center link. Tighten nuts 40 ft. lbs. (54 N•m) and install cotter pins.

SWAY BAR  (back to CONTENTS)

Removal
(1) Raise car on hoist.
Sway bar to lower control arm attaching points are aligned ONLY when lower control arms are at “design height” (equal to three passenger position with vehicle on ground). If frame contact or twin post hoist is used, release load on torsion bar by turning adjuster bolts counter-clockwise, raise lower control arms until clearance between crossmember ledge (at jounce bumper) and torsion bar to lower control arm bushing is 2-7/8 inches (73mm) (Fig. 9). Support lower control arms with jack stand during sway bar removal and installation.
(2) With lower control arms supported as described in note above, remove sway bar to torsion bar bushing attaching bolts, retainers, cushions and sleeves (Fig. 10).
(3) Remove retainer assembly strap bolts and retainer straps. Remove sway bar (Fig. 24).
(4) Inspect cushions and bushings for excessive wear or deterioration and replace if required.

FIG. 24 - Sway Bar - Removal and Installation

Installation
(1) Position sway bar bushings against retainers and install retainer straps, loose assemble retainer bolts.
(2) Reinstall bolt through sway bar retainer, cushions and sleeve, and attach to torsion bar lower control arm bushing (Fig. 16). Tighten bolt to 50 ft. lbs. (68 N•m) torque.
(3) Tighten sway bar retainer and strap bolts to 30 ft. lbs. (41 N•m).
(4) Load torsion bar by turning anchor adjusting bolt in crossmember clockwise.
(5) Lower vehicle and adjust torsion bar height to specifications.

LOWER CONTROL ARM  (back to CONTENTS)

Removal
(1) Raise car on hoist and remove wheel and tire assembly.
(2) Remove brake caliper retaining screws, clips and anti-rattle springs and remove caliper from adaptor and support caliper assembly on wire hook. (Do not hang caliper by brake hose).
(3) Remove hub and rotor assembly and splash shield.
(4) Remove shock absorber lower nut, retainer and insulator (Fig. 7).
(5) Release load on both torsion bars by turning anchor adjusting bolts counter-clockwise (Fig. 8). Releasing both torsion bars is required because of sway bar reaction from opposite torsion bar.
(6) Raise lower control arm until clearance between crossmember ledge (at jounce bumper) and torsion bar to lower control arm bushing is 2-7/8 inches (73mm) (Fig. 9). Support control arm at this “design height” and remove two bolts attaching torsion bar end bushing to lower control arm (Fig. 7).
(7) Separate lower ball joint from knuckle arm using Tool C-3564-A.
(8) Remove lower control arm pivot bolt and lower control arm (Fig. 25).

FIG. 25 - Lower Control Arm - Removal and Installation

Disassembly (Bushing Removal)
(1) Place lower control arm in vise and install bushing remover Tool C-4383 as follows:
(a) Place support fixture between flanges of control arm and around bushing as shown in (Fig. 26). Proper fixture position is required to prevent control arm distortion during bushing removal.
(b) Position cup over flanged bushing end with bolt through cup and bushing.
(c) Install pilot, thrust washer, plain washer and nut on through bolt.
(2) Press bushing out of lower control arm by holding bolt on cup end while turning nut on pilot end.

FIG. 26 - Removing lower Control Arm Pivot Bushing

Assembly (Bushing Installation)
(1) Place support fixture (Tool C-4383) on lower control arm flanges and position assembly on base of suitable press (Fig. 27). Proper fixture position is required to prevent control arm distortion during bushing installation.
(2) Position flange end of new bushing into cup squarely and press bushing into control arm until bushing flange seats on arm.

FIG. 27 - Installing Lower Control Arm Bushing

Installation
(1) Position lower control arm in crossmember, install pivot bolt and finger tighten flanged nut.
(2) Position lower ball joint stud into steering knuckle arm and tighten nut to 100 ft. lbs. (136 N•m). Insert cotter key.
(3) With control arm supported at “design height” (Fig. 9) install 2 bolts attaching torsion bar end bushing to lower control arm. Tighten bolts to 50 ft. lbs. (68 N•m) torque.
(4) Tighten lower control arm pivot bolt to 75 ft. lbs. (102 N•m).
(5) Position shock absorber stud through lower control arm. Install bushing retainer and nut. Torque nut to 35 ft. lbs. (47 N•m).
(6) Install hub and rotor assembly. See bearing adjustment in this group. Install brake caliper, retaining clips, anti-rattle springs and retaining screws. Tighten caliper retaining screws to 180 in. lbs. (20 N•m).
(7) Install wheel and tire assembly. Torque wheel stud nuts to 85 ft. lbs. (115 N•m).
(8) Load torsion bars by turning anchor adjusting screws clockwise.
(9) Lower vehicle to floor and adjust front suspension height to specifications.
(10) Adjust wheel alignment as required.

LOWER BALL JOINT (All Car Lines)

Inspection
(1) Raise the front of vehicle and install safety floor stands under both lower control arms as far outboard as possible. The upper control arms must not contact the rubber rebound bumpers.
(2) With the weight of vehicle on the control arm, install dial indicator and clamp assembly to lower control arm.
(3) Position dial indicator plunger tip against knuckle arm and zero dial indicator.
(4) Measure axial travel of the knuckle arm with respect to the control arm, by raising and lowering the wheel using a pry bar under the center of the tire.
(5) If during measurement you find the axial travel of the control arm is .030 inches (0.76 mm) or more, relative to the knuckle arm, the ball joint should be replaced.

Removal
(1) Place ignition switch in OFF or UNLOCKED position.
(2) Raise vehicle on hoist to place front suspension in rebound. Place jack stands under front frame for additional support.
(3) Remove wheel cover, wheel and tire assembly.
(4) Remove brake caliper and support with wire hook. Do not hang caliper by brake hose alone.
(5) Remove hub and rotor assembly and splash shield. Disconnect shock absorber at lower control arm.
(6) Unwind torsion bar.
(7) Remove upper and lower ball joint stud cotter pins and nuts. Slide Tool C-3564-A over upper stud until tool rests on steering knuckle.
(8) Turn threaded portion of tool locking it securely against lower stud. Tighten tool enough to place lower ball joint stud under pressure, then strike steering knuckle arm sharply with a hammer to loosen stud. Do not attempt to force stud out of knuckle with tool alone.
(9) Use assembled Tool C-4212 to press ball joint out of lower control arm.

Installation
(1) Press new ball joint into lower control arm using assembled Tool C-4212.
(2) Place a new seal over ball joint with Adapter Tool C-4039 press retainer portion of seal down on ball joint housing until it is securely locked in position.
(3) Insert ball joint stud into opening in knuckle arm and install stud retaining nuts and tighten as specified. Install cotter pins and lubricate ball joint, see Lubrication, Group “0”.
(4) Place a load on torsion bar by turning adjusting bolt clockwise.
(5) Install wheel, tire and brake assembly and adjust front wheel bearing.
(6) Lower vehicle to floor. Adjust front suspension heights.

UPPER CONTROL ARM (All Car Lines)  (back to CONTENTS)

Removal and Disassembly
(1) Place ignition switch in OFF or UNLOCKED position.
(2) Raise front of vehicle with hand jack and remove wheel cover, wheel and tire assembly.
(3) Position short jack stand under lower control arm near splash shield and lower hand jack, observe that jack stand does not contact shield and rebound bumpers are under no load.
(4) Remove brake caliper and set aside to provide clearance for ball joint remover tool.
(5) Remove cotter pin and nut from upper and lower ball joints to facilitate use of tool to free ball joint. (Fig. 28).
(6) Slide Tool C-3564-A over lower ball joint stud to allow tool to rest on steering knuckle
arm (Fig. 19) tighten tool to apply pressure to upper ball joint stud and strike steering knuckle boss sharply with hammer to loosen stud. Do not attempt to force stud out of knuckle with tool alone.
(7) After removing tool, support brake and knuckle assembly to prevent damage to brake hose or lower ball joint, then disengage upper ball joint from knuckle.
For upper ball joint removal see “UPPER BALL JOINT” this group.
(8) From under hood, remove engine splash shield to expose upper control arm pivot bar.
(9) Scribe a line on support bracket along inboard edge of pivot bar (to re-establish suspension alignment during reassembly) (Fig. 29).
(10) Remove pivot bolts or nuts and lift upper control arm with ball joint and pivot bar assembly from bracket.

FIG. 28 - Upper Control Arm FIG. 29 - Scribe Support Bracket for Alignment

Disassembly (Bushings)
(1) Place upper control arm in vise and remove pivot bar nuts and bushing retainers.
(2) Bolt support Tool C-4253-1 to pivot bar.
(3) Place puller Tool C-4253-2 over end of pivot bar and reinstall nut. Snug bolts against arm.
(4) Screw bolts equally until bushing is free in arm and remove tool and bushing.

Assembly (Bushings)
(1) With control arm in vise, put pivot bar in arm and attach support bracket spacer tool, (Tool C-4253-8).
(2) Slip bushings over each end of pivot bar and pilot into holes in arm.
(3) Install bushing cups over both bushings and press bushings together until both bushings are fully seated in arm. Pound bushings in place at the same time or use an arbor press. Bushing flange must be bottomed on control arm extrusion.
(4) Install retainers and nuts on pivot bar, snug nuts against retainers. Pivot bar bushing retainer nuts are to be tightened to specifications AFTER suspension (upper control arm) is at design height. See “Installation”, Step 7.

Installation
(1) Place upper control arm with ball joint and pivot bar on bracket. Install and snug attaching bolts against arm.
(2) Set inboard edge of pivot bar on scribed line of mounting bracket using alignment Tool C-4576. Then tighten bolts to 150 ft. lbs. (204 N•m).
(3) Replace engine splash shield.
(4) Install ball joint stud through steering knuckle and install upper and lower ball joint nuts, tighten to specifications and install cotter pins.
(5) Install brake caliper. Tighten retainer clip screws to 180 in. lbs. (20 N•m).
(6) Raise vehicle with hand jack and remove jack stand. Install wheel and tire assembly and wheel cover. Lower vehicle.
(7) With vehicle at design height tighten pivot bar nuts to 110 ft. lbs. (150 N•m).

UPPER BALL JOINT (All Car Lines)  (back to CONTENTS)

Inspection
(1) Position jack under the lower control arm and raise wheel clear of floor, remove wheel cover, grease cap and cotter pin.
(2) Tighten bearing adjusting nut enough to remove all play between hub, bearings and spindle.
(3) Lower jack to allow tire to lightly contact floor (most of vehicle weight relieved from the tire). It is important that the tire have contact with the floor.
(4) Grasp the top of the tire and apply force, in and outward. While this force is being applied, an observer checks for any movement at the ball joints between the upper control arm and the knuckle.
(5) If any lateral movement is evident, replace the ball joint.
(6) Re-adjust wheel bearing adjusting nut by raising wheel clear of floor, then tighten adjusting nut to 240 to 300 in. lbs. (27 to 34 N•m) while rotating wheel. Stop rotation and back off adjusting nut with wrench to completely release bearing preload. Next, finger tighten adjusting nut. Position nut lock with one pair of slots in line with cotter pin hole. Install cotter pin. Install grease cap and wheel cover, lower vehicle.

Removal
(1) Place ignition switch in OFF or UNLOCKED position.
(2) Raise front of vehicle with hand jack and place short jack stand under lower control arm. Position jack stand as close to wheel as possible. Be sure jack stand is not in contact with brake splash shield. Rubber rebound bumper must not contact frame.
CAUTION: Torsion bar will remain in loaded position.
(3) Remove wheel cover, wheel and tire assembly.
(4) Remove cotter pin and nut from upper end of lower ball joint to facilitate use of ball joint removal tool.
(5) Slide Tool C-3564-A on lower ball joint stud allowing tool to rest on knuckle arm. Set tool securely against upper stud.
(6) Tighten tool to apply pressure to upper stud and strike knuckle sharply with hammer to loosen stud. Do not attempt to force stud out only with tool.
(7) After removing tool, disengage upper ball joint from knuckle. Support knuckle and brake assembly to prevent damage to brake hose or lower ball joint.
(8) Remove upper ball joint using Tool C-3560.

Installation
(1) Screw ball joint squarely into control arm as far as possible by hand. Make certain ball joint threads engage those of control arm correctly if original arm is used. Seals should always be replaced once they have been removed.
(2) Tighten ball joint with Tool C-3560 until it bottoms on housing. Torque to 125 ft. lbs. (180 N•m).
(3) Position new seal over ball joint stud and install using Tool Adapter C-4039. Make sure seal is seated on ball joint housing.
(4) Position upper ball joint stud in steering knuckle and install nut. Tighten nut to 100 ft. lbs.(136 N•m).
(5) Install lower ball joint stud nut and torque to 100 ft. lbs. (136 N•m). Install cotter pin and lubricate upper ball joint. See Lubrication section.
(6) Torsion bar will remain in loaded position.
(7) Install wheel and tire assembly with wheel cover.
(8) Remove jack stand and lower vehicle.

SPECIFICATIONS  (back to CONTENTS)

  Acceptable Range Service Reset
Camber (all models)
Maximum left to right camber differential is not to exceed 1º
within specifications
 - 1/4º to + 1-1/4º + 1/2º ± 1/2º
Caster (all models)
Maximum left to right camber differential is not to exceed 1-1/4º
within specifications
+ 1/4º to + 3-3/4º + 2/2º ± 1º
Toe - Total Toe in Inches 0. to 5/16" IN 1/8" IN ± 1/16"
Toe - Total Toe in Degrees 0. to 62º IN .25º ± .10º
Front Car Height 12" to 13" 12-1/2" ± 1/4"

TIGHTENING REFERENCE  (back to CONTENTS)

(In Foot-Pounds Unless Otherwise indicated)

Adjusting bolt nut (upper control arm) 150** (203 N•m)
Ball joint to control arm 125 (169 N•m)
Ball joint stud nut (upper) 100 (136 N•m)
Ball joint stud nut (lower) 100 (136 N•m)
Rebound and jounce bumpers 200* (23 N•m)
Pivot shaft (lower arm) 75*** (102 N•m)
Steering knuckle bolts/nuts (lower) 160 (217 N•m)
Sway bar link retainer nut 100* (11 N•m)
Sway bar strap nut 30 (41 N•m)
Idler arm bolt nut 70 (95 N•m)
Tie rod end (all) 40 (54 N•m)
Tie rod sleeve clamps 150* (17 N•m)
Torsion bar bushing to lower control arm bolt/nut 70 (95 N•m)
Torsion bar pivot cushion retainer nut-bolt 85 (115 N•m)
Shock absorber (upper) 25 (34 N•m)
Shock absorber (lower) 35 (47 N•m)
Swaybar cushion bolt 65 (88 N•m)
Upper control arm pivot bushing nut 110 (150 N•m)
* Inch pounds     ** Pivot shaft bolt nut     *** Lower control arm pivot bolt nut

SPECIAL TOOLS  (back to CONTENTS)

Special Tools

 

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Dodge Diplomat
See the terms of service. • Copyright © 1997- 2006 Frank Billington IV • © 2011-2013 Allpar, LLC unless otherwise noted.
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